Latest Bitcoin Headlines

Beware: North Korean Hackers Phishing Crypto Keys

Coin Bureau - 49 min 18 sec ago

The North Korean hacking group, dubbed Lazarus, has been quite active in cyber criminal activity for the past few years.

Now, according to reports by a US cyber security firm, SecureWorks, the group may be plotting to use targeted email and phishing attacks on well-known people in the cryptocurrency space.

According to the report, the group is likely to send targeted emails that will be laden with malware. This malware will have credential harvesting capabilities in order to steal the passwords and private keys from the individuals.

Malware Mission

Secureworks stated in the report that they had been monitoring the activity ever since October. They said that the emails that were sent contained a malicious link which looked like it was for a job application in a cryptocurrency start-up.

However, the link would connect to a server under the control of the hacker and the victim would unknowingly download some malware onto their PC. This malware could then take control of the PC and copy the sensitive data.

SecureWorks also said that the amount of interest in cryptocurrency was at an all-time high in the reclusive regime. They are probably looking for a number of different exploits and payloads in order to spread the malware.

Lazarus Exploits

The group is well known in hacking and cyber security circles for their highly effective campaigns. They were the primary suspect in the hack on Sony Pictures back in 2014 and the recent spread of the wannacry malware.

Lazarus group was also supposedly responsible for one of the biggest bank heists in history when the group was able to infiltrate the central bank of Bangladesh. They made off with approximately $70m in loot.

Given that the North Korean regime is increasingly susceptible to international sanctions, these hacking attempts are a great way for the regime to get extra cash to fund the weapons program.

Focused on Cryptocurrencies

Given how easy it is to use Bitcoin globally, there is no wonder that the North Korean hackers are actively targeting it. We have previously covered numerous attempts by the North Koreans to hack South Korean cryptocurrency exchanges.

In fact, according to a report by a South Korean spy agency, the North Koreans were able to steal about $7m worth of Bitcoin and Ether as well as over 30,000 identity documents. South Korean exchanges are rich pickings because they are some of the most extensively traded markets in the world.

As a sign of how important cryptocurrency loot is to the regime, the state University in Pyongyang is running classes in blockchain and cryptocurrency technology.

According to SecureWorks, the North Koreans have been experimenting with Bitcoin going back as far as 2013. They took a look at the IP addresses of attacker machines in previous hacks and were able to link them to network connections at that time.

Opsec is Key

If you are really worried about the North Koreans stealing your crypto, you can take comfort in the fact that most of these attacks appear to use social engineering.

Unless you keep your coins on an exchange, hackers are unlikely to grab your coins as long as you do not follow suspicious links or open emails from people you do not know.

Guard your private keys with your life and always act with suspicion.

The post Beware: North Korean Hackers Phishing Crypto Keys appeared first on Coin Bureau.

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

bitcoins channel - 1 hour 6 min ago



In 2013, one bitcoin cost $20. In 2017, it costs $20 to send one bitcoin. With record highs, thriving adoption, and media attention, this should be a celebratory time for bitcoin believers. And yet it’s hard to shake the feeling that something isn’t quite right. How did we reach a point where the world’s bank killer and Western Union crippler has become incapable of taking on the institutions it once sneered at? Bitcoin is hot as hell right now. But it’s also a mess.

Also read: Bitpay Plans to Use Bitcoin Cash for Payment Invoices and Debit Loads

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

By any reckoning, 2017 has been a phenomenal year for bitcoin. Even the currency’s most ardent supporters would have struggled, 12 months ago, to predict the current state of affairs. But neither could they have envisaged, in their worst nightmares, it costing upwards of $20 to transfer a fraction of a coin. To chalk this year up as an unfettered success story calls for moving the goalposts and performing mental gymnastics. Bitcoin has made great leaps alright. It’s just unfortunate that not all of them have been forwards.

“Whaddya mean bro? Bitcoin fees are fine.”

It can be debated whether Satoshi’s white paper envisioned bitcoin as a P2P settlement for micro-transactions. What can’t be debated is that bitcoin is effectively now unsendable and undependable for anything under a couple of hundred dollars. From the clearnet to the darknet, the conversation is the same: fees have become untenable. Despite this, bitcoin’s most ardent defenders remain in denial.

On some corners of the internet, questioning the gospel of Satoshi and the infallibility of bitcoin is heresy. “I can’t send a friend five dollars without a $15 transaction fee and this is the currency of the future?” raged one Redditor, to which the first three responses on r/bitcoin ran:

  • Change the settings on your wallet?
  • I upvoted you but often the inputs of a transaction increase the cost due to size significantly.
  • There are projects being worked on to lower the transaction fees such as SegWit, Lightening Network, etc. So it will be cheaper, just give it time.

There’s a modicum of truth to these rejoinders, but in the here and now, “muh segwit” or “just wait for LN” isn’t much help.

Everyone has their price, a dollar figure at which they’d be willing to sell bitcoin, and also a figure they’re willing to pay to send it. Paying $20 to transfer $10 million of bitcoin seems reasonable. Paying the same amount to send $100 worth seems ridiculous. Bitcoin has been unsuitable for micro-transactions for some time, but it’s now reaching a stage where it’s unsuitable for mid-sized transactions.

Is bitcoin a store of wealth because that’s its best use case, or has it simply morphed into one because no one can afford to move it?

Don’t Confuse the Newbs

Many of bitcoin’s new investors are of humble means, setting aside $50 a week or whatever they can spare to put into digital currency. “Always store your coins in a wallet you hold the private key for,” they were urged. Now they’re discovering that their only option is to store their bitcoin on an exchange, at least until their holdings reach a level where it’s practical to withdraw to a hardware wallet.

If cryptocurrencies were to be likened to energy sources, bitcoin would be coal: expensive to move and impractical to transport in small quantities. It’s impossible to order a handful of coal every time you want to light a fire: it’s a sackful or nothing. Ethereum (gas) and bitcoin cash (hydro) are the opposite: cheap and on tap.

Coal does have one thing in its favor though – longevity. In cryptocurrency terms, bitcoin is a veritable fossil. It’s been there from the start and, thanks to its market dominance, brand recognition, and capital locked in, will be extremely hard to destroy. Scaling solutions will probably arrive, and transaction fees will eventually drop, though quite when is anyone’s guess. The question is if those solutions will arrive in time. Until then, bitcoin will continue to serve as coal fueling the furnace on the runaway Cryptocurrency Express: an indispensable hot mess.

What do you think is the solution to high fees? And what measures have you been taking to mitigate rising fees? Let us know in the comments section below.

Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

Express yourself freely at Bitcoin.com’s user forums. We don’t censor on political grounds. Check forum.Bitcoin.com.



Source

The post Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible appeared first on Bitcoins Channel.

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

Bitcoin News - 1 hour 6 min ago

In 2013, one bitcoin cost $20. In 2017, it costs $20 to send one bitcoin. With record highs, thriving adoption, and media attention, this should be a celebratory time for bitcoin believers. And yet it’s hard to shake the feeling that something isn’t quite right. How did we reach a point where the world’s bank […]

The post Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible appeared first on The Bitcoin News - Leading Bitcoin and Crypto News since 2012.

Stellar Price Leaps 70 Percent After Kik Announces Move to XLM Blockchain

cryptocoins news - 1 hour 9 min ago

The stellar price leaped by more than 70 percent after Kik Messenger announced that it would move its Kin token to the stellar blockchain. Kik to Move Kin Token to Stellar As CCN reported, Kik Messenger raised nearly $100 million through one of the year’s most high-profile initial coin offerings (ICOs). The company, whose popular

The post Stellar Price Leaps 70 Percent After Kik Announces Move to XLM Blockchain appeared first on CCN.

Stellar Price Leaps 70 Percent After Kik Announces Move to XLM Blockchain

CCN - 1 hour 9 min ago

The stellar price leaped by more than 70 percent after Kik Messenger announced that it would move its Kin token to the stellar blockchain. Kik to Move Kin Token to Stellar As CCN reported, Kik Messenger raised nearly $100 million through one of the year’s most high-profile initial coin offerings (ICOs). The company, whose popular

The post Stellar Price Leaps 70 Percent After Kik Announces Move to XLM Blockchain appeared first on CCN.

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

Crypto News Monitor - 1 hour 38 min ago

This article was originally posted on Bitcoin News - delivering news related to the Bitcoin network from multiple locations around the world. For more follow [...]

The post Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible appeared first on Crypto News Monitor.

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

Bitcoin.com - 1 hour 38 min ago

In 2013, one bitcoin cost $20. In 2017, it costs $20 to send one bitcoin. With record highs, thriving adoption, and media attention, this should be a celebratory time for bitcoin believers. And yet it’s hard to shake the feeling that something isn’t quite right. How did we reach a point where the world’s bank killer and Western Union crippler has become incapable of taking on the institutions it once sneered at? Bitcoin is hot as hell right now. But it’s also a mess.

Also read: Bitpay Plans to Use Bitcoin Cash for Payment Invoices and Debit Loads

Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible

By any reckoning, 2017 has been a phenomenal year for bitcoin. Even the currency’s most ardent supporters would have struggled, 12 months ago, to predict the current state of affairs. But neither could they have envisaged, in their worst nightmares, it costing upwards of $20 to transfer a fraction of a coin. To chalk this year up as an unfettered success story calls for moving the goalposts and performing mental gymnastics. Bitcoin has made great leaps alright. It’s just unfortunate that not all of them have been forwards.

“Whaddya mean bro? Bitcoin fees are fine.”

It can be debated whether Satoshi’s white paper envisioned bitcoin as a P2P settlement for micro-transactions. What can’t be debated is that bitcoin is effectively now unsendable and undependable for anything under a couple of hundred dollars. From the clearnet to the darknet, the conversation is the same: fees have become untenable. Despite this, bitcoin’s most ardent defenders remain in denial.

On some corners of the internet, questioning the gospel of Satoshi and the infallibility of bitcoin is heresy. “I can’t send a friend five dollars without a $15 transaction fee and this is the currency of the future?” raged one Redditor, to which the first three responses on r/bitcoin ran:

  • Change the settings on your wallet?
  • I upvoted you but often the inputs of a transaction increase the cost due to size significantly.
  • There are projects being worked on to lower the transaction fees such as SegWit, Lightening Network, etc. So it will be cheaper, just give it time.

There’s a modicum of truth to these rejoinders, but in the here and now, “muh segwit” or “just wait for LN” isn’t much help.

Everyone has their price, a dollar figure at which they’d be willing to sell bitcoin, and also a figure they’re willing to pay to send it. Paying $20 to transfer $10 million of bitcoin seems reasonable. Paying the same amount to send $100 worth seems ridiculous. Bitcoin has been unsuitable for micro-transactions for some time, but it’s now reaching a stage where it’s unsuitable for mid-sized transactions.

Is bitcoin a store of wealth because that’s its best use case, or has it simply morphed into one because no one can afford to move it?

Don’t Confuse the Newbs

Many of bitcoin’s new investors are of humble means, setting aside $50 a week or whatever they can spare to put into digital currency. “Always store your coins in a wallet you hold the private key for,” they were urged. Now they’re discovering that their only option is to store their bitcoin on an exchange, at least until their holdings reach a level where it’s practical to withdraw to a hardware wallet.

If cryptocurrencies were to be likened to energy sources, bitcoin would be coal: expensive to move and impractical to transport in small quantities. It’s impossible to order a handful of coal every time you want to light a fire: it’s a sackful or nothing. Ethereum (gas) and bitcoin cash (hydro) are the opposite: cheap and on tap.

Coal does have one thing in its favor though – longevity. In cryptocurrency terms, bitcoin is a veritable fossil. It’s been there from the start and, thanks to its market dominance, brand recognition, and capital locked in, will be extremely hard to destroy. Scaling solutions will probably arrive, and transaction fees will eventually drop, though quite when is anyone’s guess. The question is if those solutions will arrive in time. Until then, bitcoin will continue to serve as coal fueling the furnace on the runaway Cryptocurrency Express: an indispensable hot mess.

What do you think is the solution to high fees? And what measures have you been taking to mitigate rising fees? Let us know in the comments section below.

Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

Express yourself freely at Bitcoin.com’s user forums. We don’t censor on political grounds. Check forum.Bitcoin.com.

The post Bitcoin Fees Have Become Infeasible appeared first on Bitcoin News.

Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin

bitcoins channel - 2 hours 8 min ago



It ain’t easy owning bitcoin. Back in the day, you could own 50 BTC and nobody cared. But now that the digital currency is actually worth something, everyone wants a piece. Thieves, friends who didn’t listen, the taxman, and, when your marriage breaks down, your spouse. The blockchain might be immutable, but love isn’t. What happens to your bitcoin when you break up?

Also read: Mt Gox Creditors Petition the Court to Get Full Distribution of Bitcoins

Divorce: The Original Hard Fork Dividing up bitcoin wasn’t an issue back in the day.

In most countries, divorce involves an equal division of assets, or at least one that sees both parties walk away with a sizeable chunk. Some assets, like the family dog, can’t easily be split into two, but a bitcoin goes into 100 million parts. What happens to your cryptocurrency when your partner files for divorce? If you thought dying was complicated, you should try getting a divorce.

Divorces don’t happen overnight. Generally they’re the consequence of a gradual breakdown, during which both parties have time to squirrel away assets. That may be immoral (as immoral as the behavior that prompted the divorce), but the practise is as old as marriage itself. Cases abound of husbands pleading poverty by the time the divorce comes to court due to bank accounts that have been mysteriously drained in the months prior, and of wives maxing out credit cards. Now imagine how easy it is for your partner to “give” their bitcoins away to a friend prior to a divorce being finalized.

Coin Split

As we enter an age in which couples’ assets are increasingly digitized and under their own control, dividing them should be simple in theory. Parting with half of one’s cryptocurrency collection doesn’t come easy however. That portfolio may have taken years of careful trading and countless late nights to acquire – exacerbating marital tensions in the process. Progressive males let their wife keep her surname and give up half their crypto come the divorce. Patriarchal oppressors put it all in monero and deny everything.

All joking aside, there is evidence of bitcoin being used to squirrel away assets in anticipation of a divorce. It’s a tactic which the men’s rights movement has supposedly endorsed, and it’s a hard one to counter. If a spouse were to plead that they had gambled away all their cryptocurrency or lost it on a scamcoin, who’s to prove otherwise?

No One Wants to Divorce in a Bull Market

The prospect of a cryptocurrency divorce raises some intriguing questions. Is your spouse due 50% of your assets based on their purchase price or their current market price? Could a recalcitrant partner be forced to hand over their digital assets? And if your partner were to offer you either a lump sum or 10% of their crypto gains for the next five years, what would choose?

Two Can Token

In an era where there are token sales for banana chips and 3D shoe fitting, it seems odd that there’s not been an ICO for smart contract-powered divorce. Joining the presale for a prenup platform may sound ridiculous, but there are weirder ERC20 tokens out there. If any entrepreneurs are interested, the Divorc.io domain and NUP token both appear to be unclaimed.

There’s a genuine use case for a token here, one in which the value of both real-world and digital assets (house, car, bitcoin) is represented by a corresponding number of tokens. These are locked in a multi-sig wallet which requires three keys to be unlocked, one of which resides with an attorney. Spouses cheat and love withers but cryptography never fails.

Would you give up half your bitcoins in the event of a divorce? Let us know in the comments section below.

Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

Tired of those other forums on the subject of Bitcoin? Check forum.Bitcoin.com.



Source

The post Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin appeared first on Bitcoins Channel.

Bitcoin ETF Providers Rush to Get SEC’s Approval

Crypto News Monitor - 2 hours 14 min ago

This article was originally posted on Bitcoinist - one of the leading sources for information about Bitcoin, digital currency and blockchain technology. With one of [...]

The post Bitcoin ETF Providers Rush to Get SEC’s Approval appeared first on Crypto News Monitor.

CME Bitcoin Futures Price Above $20k in First Day Trading

CoinDesk - 2 hours 29 min ago
CME Group's bitcoin futures trading began today with an opening price above $20,000 for its January 2018 contract.

Buy on the dip

/r/Bitcoin - 2 hours 34 min ago

Suggest all those that have been waiting for one do so now

submitted by /u/libebnocof
[link] [comments]

Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin

Crypto News Monitor - 3 hours 8 min ago

This article was originally posted on Bitcoin News - delivering news related to the Bitcoin network from multiple locations around the world. For more follow [...]

The post Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin appeared first on Crypto News Monitor.

Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin

Bitcoin News - 3 hours 8 min ago

It ain’t easy owning bitcoin. Back in the day, you could own 50 BTC and nobody cared. But now that the digital currency is actually worth something, everyone wants a piece. Thieves, friends who didn’t listen, the taxman, and, when your marriage breaks down, your spouse. The blockchain might be immutable, but love isn’t. What […]

The post Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin appeared first on The Bitcoin News - Leading Bitcoin and Crypto News since 2012.

Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin

Bitcoin.com - 3 hours 8 min ago

It ain’t easy owning bitcoin. Back in the day, you could own 50 BTC and nobody cared. But now that the digital currency is actually worth something, everyone wants a piece. Thieves, friends who didn’t listen, the taxman, and, when your marriage breaks down, your spouse. The blockchain might be immutable, but love isn’t. What happens to your bitcoin when you break up?

Also read: Mt Gox Creditors Petition the Court to Get Full Distribution of Bitcoins

Divorce: The Original Hard Fork Dividing up bitcoin wasn’t an issue back in the day.

In most countries, divorce involves an equal division of assets, or at least one that sees both parties walk away with a sizeable chunk. Some assets, like the family dog, can’t easily be split into two, but a bitcoin goes into 100 million parts. What happens to your cryptocurrency when your partner files for divorce? If you thought dying was complicated, you should try getting a divorce.

Divorces don’t happen overnight. Generally they’re the consequence of a gradual breakdown, during which both parties have time to squirrel away assets. That may be immoral (as immoral as the behavior that prompted the divorce), but the practise is as old as marriage itself. Cases abound of husbands pleading poverty by the time the divorce comes to court due to bank accounts that have been mysteriously drained in the months prior, and of wives maxing out credit cards. Now imagine how easy it is for your partner to “give” their bitcoins away to a friend prior to a divorce being finalized.

Coin Split

As we enter an age in which couples’ assets are increasingly digitized and under their own control, dividing them should be simple in theory. Parting with half of one’s cryptocurrency collection doesn’t come easy however. That portfolio may have taken years of careful trading and countless late nights to acquire – exacerbating marital tensions in the process. Progressive males let their wife keep her surname and give up half their crypto come the divorce. Patriarchal oppressors put it all in monero and deny everything.

All joking aside, there is evidence of bitcoin being used to squirrel away assets in anticipation of a divorce. It’s a tactic which the men’s rights movement has supposedly endorsed, and it’s a hard one to counter. If a spouse were to plead that they had gambled away all their cryptocurrency or lost it on a scamcoin, who’s to prove otherwise?

No One Wants to Divorce in a Bull Market

The prospect of a cryptocurrency divorce raises some intriguing questions. Is your spouse due 50% of your assets based on their purchase price or their current market price? Could a recalcitrant partner be forced to hand over their digital assets? And if your partner were to offer you either a lump sum or 10% of their crypto gains for the next five years, what would choose?

Two Can Token

In an era where there are token sales for banana chips and 3D shoe fitting, it seems odd that there’s not been an ICO for smart contract-powered divorce. Joining the presale for a prenup platform may sound ridiculous, but there are weirder ERC20 tokens out there. If any entrepreneurs are interested, the Divorc.io domain and NUP token both appear to be unclaimed.

There’s a genuine use case for a token here, one in which the value of both real-world and digital assets (house, car, bitcoin) is represented by a corresponding number of tokens. These are locked in a multi-sig wallet which requires three keys to be unlocked, one of which resides with an attorney. Spouses cheat and love withers but cryptography never fails.

Would you give up half your bitcoins in the event of a divorce? Let us know in the comments section below.

Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

Tired of those other forums on the subject of Bitcoin? Check forum.Bitcoin.com.

The post Divorce is Messy – Especially When You Own Bitcoin appeared first on Bitcoin News.

The Most Pointless Cryptocurrency Tokens Ever Invented

bitcoins channel - 3 hours 12 min ago



Just as Satoshi’s vision wasn’t 1,000 bitcoin forks, the vision of ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin wasn’t to decentralize the parenting industry. This year, an avalanche of ridiculous ERC20 tokens have been issued that take vaporware to the next level. From bananas on the blockchain to smart contract-based tombstones, these are the most pointless cryptocurrency tokens ever issued.

Also read: The World’s Worst Named Cryptocurrencies

Yo Dawg I Heard You Like Tokens

ICO Alert is a goldmine of ridiculous token-based projects, and by “goldmine” read “excruciating well of despair”. There aren’t enough facepalms to include all of the inane and insane tokenized offerings to be found on its pages. To save you from plummeting down that rabbit hole never to return, we’ve done the dirty work for you and rounded up a small selection from Token Hell.

Speaking of dirty work, the first entry on our list is Dirty Coin, a “fast and discreet way to pleasure”. Its white paper (oh yes, it has a white paper) begins, without a trace of irony:

In an atmosphere of increasing belief in quick profits, currencies that rely on gimmicks for their success are then abandoned. Dirty Coin will be the first cryptocurrency used for the Adult Industry, the Escort Industry and for means of pleasure.

As an antidote to all that filth, have Prayer Token, “sent to god and stored on the blockchain”. It’s an ERC23 token that’s backed by real prayer. “I don’t know if prayer works, but if it does, then you’re getting much more value out of a Prayer Token than almost every other token in existence,” its creator implores. “This is not a joke, scam, or grift. I will pray for you as honestly and sincerely as possible. Most other tokens on the market just want your money – I want to save your soul!”

Tokenize All The Things

Imigize is the “first online 3D shoe fitting service in the world”, a claim which comes as a complete surprise. In comparison, Useless Ethereum Token looks positively useful. It’s “a standard ERC20 token, so you can hold it and transfer it. Other than that… nothing. Absolutely nothing.” That didn’t stop it from raising $40,000 in its ICO.

Operating under the slogan “Someone’s Garbage is Someone’s Treasure!” comes Trash Cash. It’s “the ultimate cryptocurrency to exchange all the garbage dumped in your wallet into a single token which can be traded in exchanges…now you can keep all the trash in one place”.

Then we have Sand Coin, a token for ordering high quality sand. Funds will be used to develop a sand quarry near Moscow. There’s also Milk Coin, another Russian token designed to raise funds for a milk production complex. Dentacoin is the world’s first blockchain project for the dentistry industry, Kevin (KVT) is “an innovative online banking service” and Cooocoin (count those o’s) is so bad it unironically uses comic sans on its website.

Maxitube is a robotized transport system for goods delivery. Apparently an “electric locomotive” will deliver goods to your address. Dopameme is a dank decentralized website where you’re rewarded for posting memes and The Memessenger is “the world’s first no-bullshit messenger with memes instead of words”. Sometimes there really are no words.

Choking On Tokens and Drowning in Decentralization

Satoshi Brewery is issuing a token to set up the largest regional craft brewery in north-west Russia and Florio is “the first blockchain based health platform that actually enables everybody to live healthy”, although how is never made clear. Exotown, meanwhile, is a reptile breeding program that specializes in selective breeding of pet reptiles and saving endangered species. Proof that the ICO game really is full of snakes.

Rexpax lets you “lend, borrow and share items with your neighbors”, but at the last check had sold just 220,000 of its 190 million Rexx tokens. More like Rekt, amirite? Without a blockchain-based lending service, how’s anyone meant to borrow a cup of sugar from their neighbor now?

Family Points is a token designed “to disrupt the parenting industry in order to make it safer, more convenient, and more transparent for everyone involved. The Family Points platform will make parenting cheaper.”

“Disrupt the parenting industry”?

Finally, we have Tombcare:

Today different applications have appeared for many spheres of life…taxi, food ordering, hotels booking, housing rent, etc. But the sphere of ceremonial services is still left in the basket. Perhaps this is due to the fact that it is often associated with sad circumstances, but the fact is that it is the billions of dollars market and its Uberisation is inevitable.

Uber for tombstones? That sound you just heard was your ancestors turning in their graves.

Most of the aforementioned ICOs are still running, incidentally, so if you hate money, you should probably invest in them.

And that’s enough internet for today.

What’s the worst token-based project you’ve heard of? Let us know in the comments section below.

Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

Need to know the price of bitcoin? Check this chart.



Source

The post The Most Pointless Cryptocurrency Tokens Ever Invented appeared first on Bitcoins Channel.

Report Alleges North Korean Hacking Group’s Involvement in Phishing scam

bitcoins channel - 3 hours 43 min ago


According to a report by the US cybersecurity firm SecureWorks released on December 15, 2017, Lazarus, the North Korean hacking group, may be plotting to launch a widespread attack targeting top personalities in the cryptocurrency ecosystem. At this time, it appears as if the payload will be delivered through authentic-looking emails loaded with attachments containing malware, but that may change in the near future. In general, malware-laden emails are not rare and typically known as phishing attempts.

SecureWorks said that it had been monitoring one such phishing attempt in October 2017 when a group of malicious emails was sent out, containing a compromised link for a job application at a London-based cryptocurrency company. If an unsuspecting user clicked on such a link, malware would be downloaded and installed on their computer, giving the hackers full control and the ability to upload a copy of their data.

SecureWorks’ Counter Threat Unit (CTU) went on to state that with the rising prices of major cryptocurrencies, it is likely that North Korean interest in them is at an all-time high and any related activities will not cease anytime soon.

Lazarus, the hacking group in question, is suspected of being responsible for several major cybercrime incidents, including the infamous 2014 Sony hack, that was rumored to be spurred by the release of “The Interview,” a film depicting North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Given that the average North Korean citizen has no real access to the internet, it has been long speculated that Lazarus maintains deep ties with the North Korean government. Furthermore, it may not be outlandish for them to be colluding, especially since the regime has shown a tendency to spy on other countries, among other clandestine activities.

A recent report from a South Korean spy agency also revealed North Korea’s possible involvement in several intrusions affecting cryptocurrency exchanges throughout 2017. An estimated $7 million worth of bitcoin and ether have been siphoned off as a result of these hacks. In addition to that, over 30,000 South Korean identities were also stolen, leading further credence to the theory that North Korea hackers could be responsible.

South Korea currently accounts for a large percentage of the global cryptocurrency trading volume. At the time of writing, Bithumb, the country’s largest cryptocurrency exchange, accounts for seven to eight percent of all bitcoin trades within the past 24 hours. Compared to exchanges that offer services to Americans, such as Coinbase’s GDAX, Bithumb’s trade volume is significantly higher and almost double at times. When you combine the geographical proximity and resulting political tension between the two Korean nations, the motivation for these hacks becomes evident.

Surprisingly, North Korean involvement in bitcoin goes back several years, even as early as 2013 when IP addresses belonging to computers linked to previous cyber attacks were discovered experimenting with the cryptocurrency. A SecureWorks spokesperson stated that a more detailed, full-fledged report would be published by the company at a later date. Hopefully, we will then be able to estimate better just how much influence North Korea has over the cryptocurrency market.



Source

The post Report Alleges North Korean Hacking Group’s Involvement in Phishing scam appeared first on Bitcoins Channel.

Hong Kong Investors Rush to Enter the Bitcoin Markets

Bitcoin News - 4 hours 14 min ago

With bitcoin again dominating headlines, a flood of new money has recently entered the cryptocurrency markets – including from emerging crypto markets such as Hong Kong. Local media outlets are reporting, however, that many new investors may be ill-prepared for the risks associated with cryptocurrency. Also Read: Japanese Investors Increasingly Switching From Traditional FX Trading to […]

The post Hong Kong Investors Rush to Enter the Bitcoin Markets appeared first on The Bitcoin News - Leading Bitcoin and Crypto News since 2012.

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